NICE & INTERESTING

At the end of 2012, students at SVA in a class taught by Alexandra Brez and W.M. Hunt responded to a challenge of selecting and wrtiting about "25 Great But Unknown Photographs". The contributors include Ryan Bianchi, Nick Bologna, Nick Blumenthal, Ashley East, Ashley Harte, Rachel Kessler, Arianna Meli, Estefany Molina, Monique Pelser, Lauren Poggi, Mat Sliwa, Ilona Szwarc, Shakirah Tabourn, and Francesca Tamse. The title for this site "Nice and Interesting" comes from the admonition NOT to describe anything as either nice or Interesting. Their thoughtful choices and insightful texts follow.
Francis Frith  (English, 1822–1898) “Mount Hermon, The Mount of Transfiguration,”ca. 1857, Albumen silver print from glass negative
 
Selected by Francesca Tamse

Mount Hermon, a mountain range that runs across the Syrian and Lebanese border is truly a marvelous landscape. What is amazing about looking at a beautiful landscape such as this is placing oneself.  The layers of rock that make up the foreground are rich with texture, it gives ability to become tactile in the photograph. The mountains in the distance covered by fog feel ghostly and mysterious, and possible to feel that the horizons feel infinite. 
Notable for his ambitious expeditions  in Egypt, Frith brought back the images as  postcard and stereograph for a wider audience to experience the scene, ‘as if they were there’.  Detail in the rock in the foreground is at eye level, a conscious decision for the production of a stereo card.
Looking at this image one-hundred fifty-five years later, the conventions of a landscape in contemporary photography have not changed. The vantage point of the landscape and the mountain as a whole is epic, grand, and monumental. The millions of tourist photographs taken of Hermon today, (parts of the range are now a ski resort to the many wealthy) cannot compare to one of the pioneer who experienced this landscape.
 

Francis Frith  (English, 1822–1898) “Mount Hermon, The Mount of Transfiguration,”ca. 1857, Albumen silver print from glass negative

 

Selected by Francesca Tamse

Mount Hermon, a mountain range that runs across the Syrian and Lebanese border is truly a marvelous landscape. What is amazing about looking at a beautiful landscape such as this is placing oneself.  The layers of rock that make up the foreground are rich with texture, it gives ability to become tactile in the photograph. The mountains in the distance covered by fog feel ghostly and mysterious, and possible to feel that the horizons feel infinite.

Notable for his ambitious expeditions  in Egypt, Frith brought back the images as  postcard and stereograph for a wider audience to experience the scene, ‘as if they were there’.  Detail in the rock in the foreground is at eye level, a conscious decision for the production of a stereo card.

Looking at this image one-hundred fifty-five years later, the conventions of a landscape in contemporary photography have not changed. The vantage point of the landscape and the mountain as a whole is epic, grand, and monumental. The millions of tourist photographs taken of Hermon today, (parts of the range are now a ski resort to the many wealthy) cannot compare to one of the pioneer who experienced this landscape.

 

Posted 1 year ago with 1 note
Tagged with #stereocard#landscape photography#19th century photography#francis frith

  1. niceandinteresting posted this